Tag Archives: Social Media

GSDI 12 – Embracing Social Media

For those who are into Spatial Data Infrastructures you are know doubt aware of GSDI 12 (Global Spatial Data Infrastructure Association) which is occurring in Singapore later this year. This conference is the 12th running and is themed ‘Realising Spatial Enabled Societies’ and I highly recommend attending as with the growth of social media, societies seem only one (large) step away from fully realising the benefits of location/spatial in day to day operations.

It is with great interest on the promotion of this even that the organisers have embraced twitter (@GSDI12) and is even using You Tube as a means to market what is happening for GSDI. As a twitter user I have been following the thread with great interest and glad to see that the updates come thick and fast throughout the weeks and are not intermittent. This keeps it fresh in my mind and even leads me to blogging about it.

Usage of social media as a means of business marketing in my mind I feel is underutilised in Australia. A statistic that I came across this morning is that 75% of SME do not use social media to advertise their business, (http://bit.ly/dynJtA) yet I find the potential to connect people to place via these mediums allows marketing spend to be targeted to those demographics businesses want to attract. It is with this last thought that I sit back and reflect on the importance of spatial/location. Yes as an industry we realise the importance on adding location as a tag into all data types although listening to a colleague yesterday, if we want to realise a spatially enabled society we need to draw out the benefits to those outside of our industry in a simple, clear way. When comparing adding location tags to data against other tags such as gender, age, nationality, what takes precedence in determining where our limited resources in data collection go?

Technology is enabling the embedding of location to become simpler. Simple user interfaces, better data infrastructures and enabling technologies to bond data between the business and the user is happening. Data infrastructures built on spatial technologies could become a key enabler for social media to expand out from current mass media and advertising markets. Imagine collecting bird sightings through a social media page rather than separate websites to track where endangered species are located in order to facilitate discussion on urban planning. Social media pages such as facebook currently get more ‘visits’ than the Google home page. In planning data infrastructure the time is right to ensure that the information being linked can also link to social media in order to enable the innovative use of data within these sites.

We are good at linking data and we need to get better at linking into current trends and enabling better evidence to be used online. I’m sure there will be many discussions in this space at GSDI 12. I look forward to seeing you there.

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The Age of Social Media: A Look at Emergency Management

Happy New year to you all. It has been a while since my last update on Project Spatial and in that time quite a bit has happened within Australia and the Spatial industry. As with each new year in Australia, extreme weather conditions seem to be a norm and bushfires are ever prevelant.

Recently in Western Australia, bushfires have ravaged the town of Toodyay, multiple fires are burning all over Australia which makes me think of a round table discssion i participated near the end of 2009. Under the Gov 2.0 taskforce a project emerged on how the government could use Web 2.0 technologies within the social media sphere to help the management of incidents such as bushfire, flood and alike. http://gov2em.net.au/

The project which only ran for a little over a month has delivered its report on how government can use social media tools to help premare and manage emergency situations. The key to it’s findings is that government needs to be able to convey trust, transparency and timeliness. In some situations, accuracy and reliability can be traded off against timeliness of information. Getting a message out there stating the threat can be more important than knowing exactly where the threat is. Of course you don’t want to instigate panic. J

I’ve talked about mashups in previous posts and the abilty to provide timely information can easily be mapped. Take the Landgate Firewatch service coming out of Western Australia, this data feed can be combined with othe feeds to create a ‘mashup’ of incidents happening around Australia. http://www.aus-emaps.com/fires.php is a good example of this where RSS feeds from NSW and Victoria are combined with Firewatch, BOM Weather and other data into a simple map.

Further out from Australia we are even seening new and exciting uses of social media for EM. For example, in San Francisco there is a twitter account setup for the earthquake prone area that people can subscribe to.  http://twitter.com/earthquakesLA. Combine this with TwitPics (see: http://mashable.com/2010/01/09/eureka-earthquake/) and you have a detailed account of an Earthquake, providing more timely information and shared accross many users faster than traditional media sources.

What is needed in Australia is a coordinated approach to 2.0 technologies in areas such as Emergency Management. Setting standards and policies will help ensure that information is not abused or worse becomes mis-trusted.

The key really is to keep it low tech (another finding of the Em 2.0 report) although as technology evolves very quickly and newer generations are turning away from normal media channels (radio, TV) any impementation of 2.0 technologies needs to stay consistent, reach a broad range of users and be simple. Technology isn’t a barrier although controling how much technology is used will remain a factor. Remember they say you only have 8 seconds to capture someones attention through the Internet so information related to EM incidents needs to stay clearly articulated and remain accessible.

Interesting Case Study on the Victorian Black Saturday Fires: http://gov2em.net.au/twittersocial-media-during-the-victorian-bushfires-february-20009-a-case-study/