Category Archives: FIG 2010

The Spatial Enablement of Society

FIG2010 has provided many insights into all aspects of Surveying and Land related activities. Surveying is not only related to cadastral land surveying as it covers all activities involving land as highlighted in my previous post.

I like to share with you some learning’s which relates to some work currently being generated with my colleagues that has been developing over the last few months and happily been reinforced with presentations at FIG 2010. The spatial enablement of society, (a FIG2010 congress plenary theme) talks about the engagement of communities, citizens and government for the betterment of society as a whole. This concept at its heart requires that we move towards a system that sees information managed spatially. The concept itself is a change to the normal ‘technical’ thinking of our industry where Spatial Data Infrastructures and technology to collect, manage and use data is traditionally the focus of our projects.

Managing Data Spatially – We know that by using a common geodetic base framework for data that we can connect, integrate and analyse data, creating information that becomes enriched intelligence. A quote from the FIG 2010 congress that stuck with me stated ‘data on its own is useless’. Quite poignant in that we as a society require information and we interpret data to create the information we require.

An issue to overcome in reaching the Mecca of data management spatially lies in the understanding, worth and inherent under valuing of our industry compared against global challenges of environment, health, climate and urban growth. Perhaps a rethinking is required to how we promote and market the industry. Surveying and Spatial are expert terms we use to describe our industry yet words such as position; location and place are more commonly understood. Using these words we could promote the industry and career opportunities in conjunction with environmental issues, climate change, health and urban growth where we create and provide intelligence for the future planning and management of these issues.

Spatial Data Infrastructures are a core component for the future information society although this is only the technical enabler. Engagement with managers and leaders of society needs a cohesive vision and strategy that looks at these global challenges, communicates the linkages to land management and heightens the value of managing information spatially. For the first time the challenges of the surveying and spatial sciences industries are moving forward with recognition that we have to do more to educate and lead in the future information society.

I suggest that you read through some of the books that touch on this subject, some of which can be found here: http://www.csdila.unimelb.edu.au/publication/books.html

Building the Capacity FIG 2010

The International Federation of Surveyors (FIG) congress rolls into town this week (Sydney April 11-16) and from all the hype surrounding this congress it will no doubt be a well received and a great learning opportunity. Of course, FIG is not primarily aimed at traditional surveyors, the ten commissions setup cover everything from education and standards to spatial data infrastructures, planning and development , real estate, valuations and also construction economics. In all, FIG covers everything to do with land and as we are seeing more and more evidence of, almost all information collected is being linked back to the land.

What does this mean to the Young Professional?

FIG is large, it is a global body tasked with promoting professional practice and standards for all things surveying. As this congress theme is ‘Facing the Challenges – Building the Capacity’ there looks to be underwhelming support on how we grow this industry as a whole. To a young professional it is an exciting time to be involved. We have seen in the past few years that giants such as Google has taken what we do and thrust it into the limelight. Google Maps if anything has heightened the value of visualising information in map form yet there is little understanding of how this information is generated, maintained and delivered to applications such as Google Maps.

Facing the Challenges

Increasing the awareness and importance of the Surveying and Spatial Industries does present a challenge to us. The challenges lie in growing the interest of students to study and join our profession, in increasing the importance of location in all types of data, the connection and integration of data and the interpretation of data providing the evidence to build and prepare for the future. No small task by anyone’s imagination.

During this congress the Young Surveyors Group are holding a number of sessions as well as presenting on topics of how to attract more young professionals into this industry. The roundtable discussion scheduled for Tuesday 13th of April will surely be an interesting open discussion on how we as a whole can tackle these issues. It is nice to see that through a structured congress, social mediums such as Facebook (http://www.facebook.com/thewinternet?ref=mf#!/event.php?eid=375142717231&index=1) provide the tools to reach out and invite all those who have an interest to voice their opinions both online and face to face.

The plenary sessions on Tuesday and Wednesday titled ‘Spatially Enabled Society and  ‘The Big Challenges’ respectively are shaping to be very interesting talks and I wholeheartedly recommend arriving early for a good seat.

The week will sure to be jammed packed and while I and others will be there at 7am each morning to help setup and coordinate the activities I hope to see you all at FIG 2010. If the registrations are anything to go by this will surely be the biggest congress of its type in Australia for the last few years.